REMEMBRANCES OF JENNIE CALL TOLMAN BY HER SISTER LULA CALL NELSON

I was born Sept 9, 1885 and Jennie was born two months later Nov 11, 1885. Our father was Chester Vinson Call. My mother Annie Jannett Barlow and hers Minnerett Barlow. (Annie and Minnerett were sisters.)

My earliest memories include Jennie. Jennie's mother and children used to live with Grandma Barlow in Bountiful. The first time I can remember us together was one time when we were visiting at Grandma Barlow's, too. I can see us now - two little girls - two years old, wandering in the garden, lost -- about ten feet from the house. Grandmother had a large row of native currants and we didn't know where we were. Someone came out and shook a white table cloth. We saw it and soon all was well.

When Aunt Minnie (Minerette) and children came to Chesterfield, they lived in a part of mother's house. Father took his families and went to Afton, Wyoming. Our mothers houses were not far apart. There was a little creek between them. Jennie and I had been playing in the water and I suppose our clothes were wet. Father came home and caught us and gave us a paddling and told us to stay out of the water; and one time after we were all back in Chesterfield, I don't know what Jennie and I had been doing but he put one of us in one corner of the room and the other in the other corner. Then he walked from one to the other slapping our heads a little till he got us together then knocked our heads together.

I remember one time on the Fourth or Twenty-fourth of July, Jennie and I and two other girls, Effie and Jennie Moss, were asked to sing. Mr. Wilson, our choir leader, helped us but the Moss girls got the prize money, which I believe was $2.50. However, we ran a race after that, and I came out winner that time.

After Father came home from his mission I know Aunt Minnie (Minerett) lived in a house built by Uncle Truman Barlow. Here they lived when Aunt Minnie died in 1901. Jennie was 15 years old. Aunt Minnie's children came to live with us and we lived as one family from then on. It was July 4th of that same year that Grandmother Barlow died in Afton, Wyoming.

We had wonderful times at the dances. I remember they had a bow dance. The girls made bows and put them in envelopes with their names and the boys drew. Judson Tolman got Jennie's bow and after that it was Jennie for him. He took her out for awhile, then Francis Carney. We three girls were all he went with, to my knowledge.

We girls had to help with the milking. Our sister, Minnie, worked out a lot. When Jennie and I went to milk, we helped each other. If one got through first, the other cow was finished by both girls.

One day we went to town for something and stayed out after dark. It was Halloween. Jennie was going with Judson and he was walking us home. We hadn't got far on our way home when we met Father and our sister, Minnie. Father asked us a few questions then said to Judson, "I'll take the girls home now." Maybe Judson was glad. It saved him a long walk.

Minnie had made Jennie and me each a nice pink blouse for Christmas, but we didn't get to enjoy them very much because our house burned down and the blouses with it. I think this was sometime in Feb. Father and Mother, with Ensign and Lucy were on their way to Bancroft. Jennie and I were washing a few things. Rubin didn't feel very well and was lying in the front room by the stove. The stove pipe ran up through the ceiling. The fire started in the upstairs and Rubin could see it around the stove pipe. Mable and Mamie were there. The neighbors around saw it and soon came. We girls were just bewildered. The flames looked so wicked. They were just fighting back and forth. It was terrible.

Jennie and Judson were married 3 Sept 1902. It was the next spring after they were married they lived in the old Lamoni Tolman home. r went over to see her and we had a good visit as we always did when we got together. We went to the garden and pulled a pan of radishes. We ate them with some bread and butter and maybe a glass of milk. We surely did enjoy them.

At choir practice one night we were all singing and down went Jennie with a thud. It surely frightened us. They picked her up, got water and put on her face and she was soon all right. She was pregnant and I think that was the reason she fainted. I don't know of her ever fainting again.

Ephraim and I were soon married and were visiting them when Minnie Meleta was born. They were in the front room of your grandmother Tolman's house then. These times I mention are not the only times we saw each other but are the ones I think of at this time.

Then our husbands were called on missions. They left in September of 1903. Judson went to Scotland and Ephraim went to New Zealand. While they were gone Jennie and I with our babies, lived together in a house called the Shoemaker place. We had it fixed up pretty nice. We had hand made rugs on the floor. We said a floor without rugs is like walls without pictures. I am quite sure the house had three rooms it. I stayed there longer than Jennie did. I don't remember if she got work somewhere or not. Mary Druscilla was born in Chesterfield and Genevieve soon after they moved to Preston. Our baby, Urilla, was born 27 of March the same year.

For a time they lived in Riverdale and worked with Leon Mecham in the creamery. I visited them there. Our last babies were born close together also, Juanita, 3 Jan. and LaVaun the 14 Jan in 1914. We were so sorry when they had to lose their baby. Jennie was very sick too and had to go to the hospital. She got better and came to visit us on our homestead. She was not really well though. She had diabetes and drank so much water all the time. We really enjoyed being together again. Aunt Mamie said your mother was up to the 50th anniversary of the Chesterfield Ward. That may be the time she was at our place, I don't remember.

I do not remember about her last illness. I just remember going to their home after she had passed away. She was so very thin. I couldn't see Jennie there at all.



THINGS THAT I REMEMBER ABOUT MY SISTER JENNIE IDA MABEL CALL

The first thing that I remember was, I think that she had been a little bit sassy to her mother and her mother was giving her a whipping. Then I remember that we walked to school and back home, about two miles. It seems that I don't remember much about our childhood days as her mother used to live quite a lot in Utah. At the time her mother died, they lived about a quarter mile from us. She died in January and Jennie and the other children came to live with my mother, her Aunt Annis, and her father. On the 14 of February of the same year, our house burned down and most everything in the house was burned. Jennie and Lula were anxious to fix their room up nice so they had been in a hurry to bring Jennie's mother's things up. They were afraid, too, that some one might go into the house the things were in, if the things were left in the empty house. My mother didn't think that they should be in such a hurry, but they wanted to get them. So they were all burned too, as they were in a upstairs bedroom. The fire started in the upstairs and we were unable to save anything from up there. There were at least four beds up there and all our clothes. Each of us girls had a box or a trunk for our things. Father had made a nice box, like a trunk. I had that. Jennie had her mother's trunk. I don't remember what Lula and Mamie had. We kept our clothes, dolls, and other things that we wanted to keep in them. Jennie and Mamie had real nice 4resses that their mother had made for Christmas. I had a nice one that my sister Minnie had made. I think that Jennie and Lula got to go to the dance that night, since it was Valentin~'s Day. The girls used to go to Mutual and choir practice and sang quite a lot. We all worked out some as we got older. And of course we helped to build our new brick home. While we were getting it built, we moved back to Jennie's mother's, my Aunt Minnie's home, where she died. We fixed the granary and the machine shed into bedrooms. It was quite hard getting money those days.

Jennie was married quite young. She and Judson and Aunt Dora Barlow sang some beautiful songs. Char10tte Tolman Mecham played the organ for them. Jennie was a beautiful alto singer. I remember one time when the girls went serenading on the 4th of July, they sang "Whispering Hope" and several other songs outside our open window early in the morning. I thought that "Whispering Hope" was the most beautiful song I had ever heard. The Moss girls were there also and they were beautiful singers. When I hear that song now I always think of those girls serenading.

I do remember one Christmas when Judson came for Jennie. He came in a little buggy as there was not any snow that year.

When they were married, they lived in the old Shoemaker place. I remember visiting Jennie on Thanksgiving, 25th of November, as she had a new little baby girl, who was named Minnie Meleta. She like her mother has become a beautiful singer. Druscilla was also born in Chesterfield. I told Jennie I was going to name my little girl Druscilla when I had one. But she got one first and also the name. I had read a story I liked and the girl in it was named Druscilla. Another time I was up to Jennies and she wanted me to rearrange all her dishes in her cupboard. While they lived there a pack rat got in their ceiling. It had baby stockings, rice, and a lot of things up there before they caught him. She used to put her wash water on at night. Then she would get up at four o'clock in the morning and start the fire. She would go back to bed for a little while, but she always got an early start.

When I went to get married, Jennie came and helped Mamie finish getting ready. She told me to never put off my wedding as it would be bad luck. I had been considering it, because my dress, which I had sent for, hadn't come.

Later they moved to Riverdale. When Grace, my baby, was little we stayed there with them one night. Grace was crying and I was doctoring her for a stomach ache. Jennie said that she thought that she might have an ear ache. She fixed a piece of cotton with some black pepper in it and dipped it in warm olive oil and sure enough Grace was soon asleep. The next day we went to Preston and Minnie Meleta followed quite a long ways. The men working on the road took her home.

The next time that I saw Jennie, she had a new home in Preston. I stayed a week with her and enjoyed being with her. She had a real nice garden but was far from well. She had diabetes. She would take a large pitcher of water each night when she went to bed and would drink it all. Her tongue was parched and cracked open and she had to drink all the time. Of course they didn't have the help for diabetes that they have now.

The next time I saw Jennie, she was dead. We were in Salt Lake for MIA Conference and Sidney and Amy's wedding. Father and Mother were in the temple with them. They sent for Father and Mother to come to to Jennies as she was real sick. They stayed with her till she died, on the 15th of June. I went to Amy's mother's to a wedding reception for Amy and Sidney. Then I went to Jennie's funeral. I think that I combed her hair. I forgot to say in Jan 1914 when she lost her baby she was real sick. Father and Mother went with her to Logan to the hospital. We all fasted and prayed for her and she was very sick. She recovered and lived a little over a year. She had blood poisoning.



LETTER ABOUT JENNIE CALL BY JENNIE MOSS NORTON

My Dearest Odessa,

Your mother Jennie Call and your Father, Judson Adonirum Tolman Jr. were married Sept. 3, 1902 in the Logan Temple by Apostle M. W. Merrell. Apostle Merrell was my uncle.

They say, after Judson's mother had six daughters, she was so desirous of having a son that she fasted and prayed asking our Heavenly Father to send her a son. Because of his natural sweet disposition she always felt Judson was an answer to her prayer. He was baptized Jan 14, 1894 by his father Judson A. Tolman Sr. He was confirmed the same day by Chistran (sic) Jensen.

The first time I remember seeing your mother was at a dance in Chesterfield, Idaho. We must have been about fifteen years old. Your mother was seventeen when she was married. My sister, Effie, Lula and Jennie all three, had their wedding dance on the same night.

Effie and I used to sing in competition with Jennie and Lula. We were known as the "Moss sisters" and the "Call Sisters".

Y our mother made her own wedding dress. It was trimmed from the neck to the bottom with narrow satin ribbon. The ribbon became wider as it neared the bottom. I have never in my life seen such a beautiful dress. I took the part of a rich young lady in a three act play. Your mother let me wear her wedding dress.

We lived quite near to each other. In fact we used to race each other to see which could have her wash on the line first.

My mother and Jennie's mother were very close friends. Your grandmother had very poor health. While our mothers visited, Jennie and I would fill our aprons with green peas and go sit in the hay field to eat them. We had a little verse we used to say. (One I love; two I love; three I love; I say. Four I love with all my heart, and five I cast away. Six she loves; seven he loves; eight they both love. Nine he comes; ten he tarries; eleven he courts and twelve he marries).

We moved from Chesterfield in 1906 and I lost track of my good friends.

A friend

Jennie Moss Norton



MEMORIES OF ODESSA TOLMAN CLAWSON

THE ONLY MEMORY I HAVE OF MY OWN MOTHER IS COMING INTO THE HOUSE FROM PLAY AND SEEING HER IN A ROCKING CHAIR SEWING ON A BABY DRESS FOR A BABY SHE WAS EXPECTING. THE KITCHEN FLOOR WAS SHINING, THE TABLE TOPS WERE GLISTENING AND THE KITCHEN SPARKLED. SHE DIED WHEN I WAS 4 YEARS OLD.

A DEAR FRIEND OF MY MOTHER, JENNIE MOSS NORTON, TOLD ME THAT MOTHER MADE HER OWN WEDDING DRESS. IT WAS TRIMMED FROM THE NECK TO THE BOTTOM WITH NARROW SATIN RIBBON. THE RIBBON BECAME WIDER AS IT NEARED THE BOTTOM. SISTER NORTON SAID, " I HAVE NEVER IN MY LIFE SEEN SUCH A BEAUTIFUL DRESS."

I HAVE BEEN TOLD THAT MY MOTHER HAD A BEAUTIFUL ALTO SINGING VOICE AND THAT SHE SANG WITH HER SISTERS. THEY SANG IN A GROUP KNOWN AS THE CALL SISTERS AND WERE GENEROUS IN SHARING THEIR TALENT.

MY FATHER REMARRIED ABOUT A YEAR AFTER MY MOTHER'S DEATH.

MY STEP MOTHER CECELIA DURFEE TOLMAN WAS A TALENTED AND GENEROUS WOMAN. IT WAS NOT EASY CREATING A HOME FOR FOUR INDEPENDENT GIRLS, BUT SHE DID HER BEST,

SHE WAS VERY TALENTED WITH HER HANDS. DOING EMBROIDERY, CROCHET, PAINTING CERAMICS, WOODWORKING.

SHE MADE ALL KINDS OF CANDY; CHOCOLATES, BON BONS, DIVINITY, MOLDED HARD CANDY, PEANUT BRITTLE. SHE SOLD CANDY TO HELP WITH THE FAMILY FINANCES. AS A YOUNG GIRL I USED TO GO DOOR TO DOOR SELLING BOXES OF CANDY. WE HELPED HER DIP CHOCOLATES.

SHE WAS AN EXCELLENT GENEALOGIST AND VERY GENEROUS WITH HER TIME IN TEACHING OTHERS AND IN MAKING BOOKS OF REMEMBRANCE FOR FAMILY MEMBERS AND FRIENDS. SHE HAD MANY SPIRITUAL EXPERIENCES AS SHE DID FAMILY RESEARCH.

SHE TAUGHT BEE HIVE FOR OVER THIRTY YEARS. LONGER THAN ANY OTHER TEACHER IN THE CHURCH AT THAT TIME.

SHE WAS VERY DRAMATIC AND HAD A GREAT SENSE OF HUMOR. ONE TIME TO ILLUSTRATE A LESSON ON HUMILITY, UNKNOWN TO HER BEE HIVE CLASS, SHE MADE PRIOR ARRANGEMENTS WITH MEIERS MARKET AND PREPAID FOR HER GIRLS TO GET THEIR DINNER THERE. THEN SHE ASKED THE GIRLS GO TO MEIERS MARKET AND BEG FOR FOOD. SHE LOVED TO TELL THAT STORY AND IT GOT BETTER WITH EACH TELLING.

WE LOVED TO HEAR HER TELL A STORY.

SHE TOLD ONE ON MY HUSBAND, ORIN, WHO WAS HER NEPHEW. WHEN ORIN WAS A SMALL BOY IN MEXICO, THEY HAD BERRIES. THE VINES WERE SO CLOSE TOGETHER THAT THE CHILDREN COULD HIDE IN THEM. ONE DAY THEY WERE LOOKING FOR THE KIDS AND FOUND EVERYONE BUT ORIN. MAMA SAID VERY LOUDLY, I GUESS ORIN DOESN'T WANT AN ICE CREAM CONE ANYWAY. IT DIDN'T TAKE VERY LONG FOR ORIN TO APPEAR.

SHE TOOK IN ANYONE WHO NEEDED A PLACE TO STAY. THERE WAS ALWAYS SOME ONE STAYING IN OUR HOME. AT CONFERENCE TIME WE GIRLS SLEPT ON THE FLOOR AND GAVE OUR BEDS TO VISITING FAMILY MEMBERS.

ORIN AND I AND THREE CHILDREN STAYED WITH MAMA AND FATHER ONE SUMMER WHEN WE MOVED FROM HURRICANE TO SALT LAKE, WHILE WE WERE LOOKING FOR AN APARTMENT.

WHEN ORIN AND I WERE LIVING IN SAN DIEGO, MONEY WA5 5CARCE AND I DIDN'T HAVE MUCH TO SPEND ON MYSELF. MAMA SENT ME SOME CASH FOR MY BIRTHDAY AND 5AID I WA5 TO BUY MY5ELF A 5UIT. THEN 5HE A5KED ME TO WRITE BACK AND DE5CRIBE WHAT I HAD BOUGHT 50 5HE WOULD KNOW THAT I 5PENT IT ON MYSELF AND NOT ON FAMILY EXPENSES.

AFTER FATHER DIED, SHE BUILT HER LITTLE HOME U5ING THE GARAGE AS A SHELL. SHE DID THE CARPENTRY HER5ELF. IT WAS VERY COMFORTABLE AND PLEA5ANT AND 5HE LIVID THERE UNTIL HER LA5T ILLNES5 JU5T PRIOR TO HER DEATH.

5HE WA5 A WONDERFUL 5TEP MOTHER AND AN EXAMPLE OF G05PEL LIVING. I PAY TRIBUTE TO HER AND TO ALL MOTHERS AND TO ALL GOOD WOMEN. IN THE NAME OF JE5U5 CHRI5T, AMEN.